Boscobel House & a royally approved book nook

Boscobel House Boscobel House Boscobel House lodge

If you live in the Midlands, it is pretty much mandatory that you will go on a school trip to Boscobel House.

The hiding place of King Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651, Boscobel House was a safe place for Catholics during a time of religious persecution. I remember learning about that at school and being horrified that people were killed because of their beliefs – and what’s even worse is that hundreds of years later, the world hasn’t learned a thing. 

Boscobel House loft Boscobel House, Royal Oak Tree

After spending a night in an oak tree (the tree above is not the actual oak tree, it’s a descendant), Charles II hid in a priest hole in the beautiful lodge, before making his escape to France.

Boscobel House stables

I remember visiting Boscobel House with school as a kid and imagining what it must have been like to live there; and that’s something that hasn’t changed now. I tend to fall into the trap of thinking it must have been really romantic, but the reality of a working farm in the 1600s was probably most things but romantic. That said, I can’t help but feel that the house must have looked just as beautiful back then.

Can you imagine wandering around the garden and getting to look back on this stunning house? It looks so idyllic – I can’t believe that it wouldn’t have seemed the same way 400 years ago.

Me wearing a silly at at Boscobel HouseBoscobel House dairy kitchenBoscobel House kitchenBoscobel House bookshelf

And the inside was just as perfect. Just look at that bookshelf – you know I’m a sucker for a good bookshelf. Remember how I felt about the library in Drottningholm Palace?

Boscobel House book nook

But perhaps best of all, Boscobel House is home to a dreamworthy book nook. And it’s that ideal a book nook, that even Charles II allegedly spent a few hours reading here. A ROYALLY APPROVED BOOK NOOK!

Can you imagine how nice it must have been on a warm summers day, to sit there and look back towards the house while turning the pages of your book. And in the winter, you’d drag a few blankets up there, a cup of cocoa and wait for snow to coat the garden. Ugh, isn’t that a bookworm’s idea of heaven on earth?

British history is so cool. I’m so lucky to live in a part of the country that has a wealth of buildings and places with interesting stories and roles played in the history of this country. That said, you don’t have to look too far in the UK to find interesting historical things.

Boscobel House, Cockerel Boscobel House lambs

If you’re near the Midlands, I definitely recommend a trip to Boscobel House; rock up, go on a tour and explore the house, have a picnic, wander down to White Ladies Priory, see some sheep (and run away from a cocky looking cockerel…), and explore the lush, green countryside.

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