Monthly Archives

August 2017

Canada, Travel

How Vancouver won us over

August 15, 2017

How Vancouver Won Us Over - View from Stanley Park

We arrived in Vancouver after a relaxing few days exploring Tofino and were immediately thrown into the chaos of a two hour traffic jam, one way streets, and trying to find parking while really hangry. We were not instantly bowled over by Vancouver, and I think we said "I hate this place and want to leave" about ten times on the first night.

Our grumpiness could not last because Vancouver fought hard and won us over. In the space of a few days we went from "this place is horrible" to "yeah, I could see us living here", which is the ultimate sign of an awesome place. Vancouver was like a badly behaved puppy; you can try to stay stern with it and teach it a lesson but it's so darn adorable that you end up smushing your face on it after approximately three seconds. That's not a great analogy but you know what I mean.

So, what did Vancouver do to win us over and make us want to move there?

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The Lions Gate Bridge from Stanley Park, Vancouver

1. Stanley Park

It's easy to see why Stanley Park has won "best park in the world" awards (I would love the job of being judge of that) as soon as you step into 400-hectacres of lush rainforest, trails, sea walks, beaches, seals, ice cream, and more. We spent a whole day exploring Stanley Park and there was still so much we hadn't done. You could easily spend two days exploring the park and still might not do everything you want to. It's not just the park itself, it provides you with stunning views of Vancouver and the mountains to the north.

We considered hiring bikes but after realising how often we'd be stopping to take photos, we decided against it and walked our legs off instead.

I'm not going to lie, when we were researching what to do in Vancouver I kept seeing Stanley Park pop up and I thought, "it can't be that great, surely?" Cynical me was so wrong. It is that great and I am so jealous of those lucky Vancouverites who have this place right in the middle of their beautiful city.

Granville Island Public Market

Eating octopus at Granville Island

View to Vancouver from Granville Island

2. Granville Island Market

Walking around the delicious delights of Granville Island's food market was one of the first times we said "I could live here." We had this romanticised idea of popping down to Granville Island for some fresh produce, meat (Daz got way too enthralled by a meat counter and was practically drooling) or cake (that was my turn to drool). I'm sure that's not what the majority of people living in Vancouver actually do, but it's a really nice thought.

We explored the market and enjoyed some food outside while taking in the mountains, bridges, and buildings all around us. For such a huge city, it feels very calm on Granville Island and if you're lucky enough, you might spot a seal while eating a burrito; not sure where else in the world you can do that.

Golden sunset at Third Beach, Stanley Park

3. Beaches

One of the things we loved most about Vancouver is that it's so easy to escape the hustle and bustle of being in a city of 2.5 million people. There is a lot of sandy space scattered around Vancouver, where you can do a spot of swimming if you fancy it, seal spotting, volley ball, build sandcastles; not things you generally associate with being in a city.

Again, I'm jealous of the people living in Vancouver who can take a stroll to the beach whenever they fancy it. Do you know how far away our closest beach is? Over two hours!

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Sunset from Third Beach, Vancouver

4. Sunsets

That brings us nicely to our next point; beautiful sunsets. Sunsets were a thing that evaded us on the first part of our trip because it was so cloudy. After a day of exploring Stanley Park, we decided to head down to Third Beach to watch the sun set and we were treated to a beautiful one.

Around us, friends and families were having mini parties on the beach, playing some awesome tunes, playing games, and watching one very brave man partake in a bit of swimming at 9pm. It felt so relaxing and you can tell that the locals truly appreciate the beautiful spaces they've got in the city.

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View over the Lion's Gate Bridge to North Vancouver and mountains at night

5. Vancouver at night

The city does not get any less beautiful when the sun goes down. The bridges and buildings light up, forming mesmerising reflections in the water that are too good not to photograph.

After dark, we visited Coal Harbour, the Lion's Gate Bridge and the TELUS Science Centre and we were not disappointed at all. If you visit Vancouver, you need to make some time to see the city light up at night because it's wonderful. And you will definitely not be the only one out there with your tripod and camera, that city is a photographers delight.

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Seal swimming off Third Beach Vancouver

6. Wildlife

As if Vancouver hasn't already got enough going for it, it pulled out the big guns; wildlife. You haven't got to try hard or look for long before you'll spot a seal swimming around the sea wall. We also spotted squirrels in Stanley Park, and we saw our first raccoon! Now, I know "trash pandas" are considered vermin but we don't have them in the UK and we were so excited when we spotted one. Fantastically, it was coming out of one of those big container bins and went and hid under it as soon as it saw us. We were really happy about seeing one and ticking another "new animal" off our list.

View over Deep Cove from Quarry Rock

7. Mountains & Forests

Within less than an hour you can be out of the city and exploring forests and mountains, with the only reminder that you're near a city being the tall buildings you can just about see on the horizon.

We only had time to explore Deep Cove and Lynn Canyon, but there's so much more to see around Vancouver; there's Grouse Mountain, you're not that far from Squamish, you could catch a ferry over to Vancouver Island, or you could take a drive up the Sea to Sky Highway.

Pastel pink sunset from Third Beach Vancouver

Vancouver really is a city that has it all. While we didn't explore much of the inner city because we didn't have time, we liked what we saw. We took a walk around Yaletown one night and the place was bustling and had a really relaxed vibe. Our three days in Vancouver were clearly no where near enough and we'd both love to go back and see some more of the city, and who knows, maybe we'll end up living there?

Pin me for your Vancouver adventure planning

7 reasons why you'll fall in love with Vancouver

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Life

DIY mid-century hairpin nightstand – for those who cannot DIY

August 10, 2017

DIY midcentury hairpin leg nightstand

My forte is not DIY or building furniture. My forte is eating cake, stroking cats and dogs, and crying about not living in Canada, it is not building furniture; and yet I somehow built two hairpin nightstands.

Honestly, my DIY skills are woeful. I am better suited to providing refreshments, unless you want me to have to reassemble a TV stand three times because I keep putting bits the wrong way round (that happened once).

I fell down a Pinterest hole one day while looking for bedroom inspiration and saw a mid-century hairpin nightstand that I fell in love with. When I did some research I found some beautiful ones on Etsy, but I can't justify well over £100 for someone to stick our phones, books, and TV remote. I skulked back to Pinterest and ended up finding a tutorial for a hairpin nightstand which looked doable even with my poor DIY skills.

Luckily, my Mum was having a clearout and was getting rid of a big piece of wood that she'd used as a desk top. It was in perfect condition and was exactly the right size to make two matching nightstands; winner! I'm so pleased with how they turned out. I had this vision in my head of what they would look like and I didn't really think they would live up to it, but they surpassed it.

If I can make hairpin nightstands, anyone can, trust me. It required a handful of skills and the guidance of my Mum, who I swear can do pretty much anything (I would not be surprised if she told me she was secretly an astronaut).

Old piece of wood from a desk

Waxing the wood

Materials & cost

  • Wood: free (140cm x 57cm, which made two nightstands 45cm wide, 25cm deep, and 15cm tall)
  • Legs: £66 for 2 x sets of 4 black hairpin legs 35.5cm/14inches tall from The Hairpin Leg Co. on eBay (they appear to be more expensive on their own website for some reason.)
  • Wax: Colron medium oak wax - £14.99
  • Corner braces: 16 for £15.34
  • Screws: this will depend on the thickness of your wood and whether or not your legs come with screws. My legs did, but they were a a couple of mm too long for my wood, so I had to buy more screws. I used 32 screws for attaching the legs and 32 screws for attaching the brackets.
  • If you don't already have a saw, sandpaper, and a screwdriver, you will need those too.

All in all, I spent about £120 on the materials and tools for two nightstands. No, that isn't super cheap but it is cheaper than paying over £150 per nightstand. Plus, I have tools for any future DIY endeavors...and the wax will be used again to polish the nightstands. And honestly, the feeling of walking into a room and seeing something you made sitting there is priceless. The biggest cost by far were the legs, which you might be able to save some money if you shop around but I didn't see anything much cheaper.

Two mid-century hairpin nightstands DIY tutorial

Hairpin nightstand tutorial

Hairpin nightstand tutorial

  • Decide how big you want your stands to be and the best way to cut the pieces of wood from the wood you've got. Ours are 45cm wide, 25cm deep and 15cm high, which is perfectly big enough to put things on and for our cat to sleep inside...
  • Mark out your pieces and saw them out.
  • Sand the edges until they're smooth. If you're re-using wood like I was, you might need to sand off any marks or old wax.
  • If you need to remove any old wax use some turpentine in a well-ventilated area; it might smell nice, but y'all don't need to get high off it.
  • Decide which pieces will be top pieces, bottom pieces, and which way you want the side pieces; this probably isn't a big issue if you're using new wood, but it's important if you're re-using wood that might have scratches, holes, or marks on it.
  • Apply whatever wax, varnish or paint you want; or leave it plain.
  • Mark out where you want to place your corner braces; we marked ours 6cm from the front and back edges to make sure the corner brace screws didn't get in the way of the leg screws.
  • Attach the corner braces; if you have a small screwdriver this will be really easy because you'll have no problems attaching the top. If you don't, it is a little trickier, but it is doable.
  • Mark out where you want the legs to go and screw them in.
  • Put your table in your bedroom and drool over how beautiful and Pinterest-worthy it looks.
  • Put the kettle on, have a cup of something hot and eat cake, you've earned it.

DIY hairpin leg nightstand

All in all, it took my Mum and I about six hours to finish two nightstands. The longest part was prepping and waxing the wood; screwing it all together and attaching the legs probably took about an hour. If it's nice outside, you could easily finish this project off in a day and go to bed with a beautiful hairpin nightstand next to your bed the same night. It was seriously easy and it's so satisfying to 1) get to use up something which was going to landfill otherwise and 2) to see something you've made getting put to use in your own home.

Have you ever made any furniture?

Fancy making your own hairpin nightstand? Pin me for later!

DIY hairpin leg nightstand tutorial

Ethical, Life

Living healthily & ethically should not be a privilege

August 9, 2017

Fresh cherries on a fruit stand at Granville Island, Vancouver
Since the start of 2017, I have been making a conscious effort to live more consciously and ethically. The two biggest things I have discovered since then are; 1) it feels overwhelming a.f, 2) it’s expensive. The first one is understandable but the second is not ok.

If you live in a modern country, you can walk into any town or city and find pretty much anything you want or need. Try doing that when you’re trying to only buy ethical, cruelty free, animal product free, and horrible chemical free products. It is hard. Luckily, my town has a Holland & Barrett, so at least I don’t have to buy my toothpaste online. I couldn’t even find a wooden toothbrush in any physical stores in my town. You can buy plastic toothbrushes in every shape and colour imaginable, but you want an eco-friendly alternative? Sorry, no chance.

Isn’t it ridiculous that it’s so hard to find highstreet stores that pay their workers fair wages and don’t damage the environment?

Some supermarkets in my area sell some Ecover and Method products (environmentally friendly cleaning), they sell soil association approved organic fruit, and handmade soap in zero waste packaging. But, they are more expensive than their commercial or non-organic counterparts.

There are good reasons for that, though:

  • Companies are not just using cheap chemicals or materials, they’re using more expensive, organic ingredients.
  • These products might take more man hours.
  • People are being paid fairly.

Those are all huge positives, until it comes down to the customers wallet. You can want to support all the ethical companies in the world but being able to do it isn’t always possible. Not everyone can justify an extra quid or two on every ethical item they buy, because that quickly adds up and eats away at your budget.

Surprisingly, shopping more ethically for clothing was the easiest part for me. Ethical clothing is vastly more expensive than highstreet garments and that truly demonstrates the problem with fast fashion. You don’t have to actually buy from ethical clothing companies to shop more ethically because there are plenty of second hand options available if you give yourself time to plan and search for what you need. But you can’t do that with your food shop, cosmetics or hygiene products.

This doesn’t just come down to me, or you, wanting to make an ethical choice, it’s also about our health. Organic, pesticide free fruit and vegetables are more expensive than non-organic produce. As I’ve already said, that’s because of the time and skill needed but being able to provide a healthy diet for our families should not be a privilege.

I’m not really sure what the solution is, but I do know that living ethically, healthily, and consciously should be available for everyone regardless of their budget.

The world has changed a lot since our grandparents were kids. While the technological age makes us more connected globally, I think it has made us disconnected locally; life seems to run at a faster pace and less thought is given to our communities and environment. In an ideal world, we could adopt a slower lifestyle, learn to make some of our own clothes, make our own cleaning products, and only buy from local farmers and growers. Unfortunately, that’s not possible for the majority of people.

I’m fairly certain that the solution to this problem is a huge overhaul in society but how likely is that? When your own government have to be forced by courts to do something about pollution problems in the capital city and publish a half assed, weak response that passes the responsibility, how does that kind of change happen? The public can have their say all they want but if the government don’t care then nothing will change. We need to encourage the people in power to make a change because it is unlikely to happen otherwise.

Maybe I am being unnecessarily pessimistic, but when you hear that climate change isn’t in your prime ministers top list of things to focus on, it’s easy to be disheartened. What does it matter if you or I change our habits if the government don’t care (about a lot of things concering most people)?

What on earth have we done to get to the point where living ethically, fairly, and healthily is a privilege?

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Canada, Travel

Trestle Bridge & Niagra Falls | Goldstream Provincial Park

August 8, 2017

Trestle Bridge, Goldstream Provincial Park

Our first three days in Canada were solid travelling AND STRESS, so we were delighted to reach Vancouver Island and to start our trip off with a hike to Niagra Falls (not THAT Niagra Falls) and to the trestle bridge in Goldstream Provincial Park.

To be honest, we would have completely missed out on Goldstream if it hadn't been for this blog post I read on Go Live Explore. As soon as I saw Alicia's photos of the trestle bridge, I knew I wanted to see it for myself. It was well worth the leg burn and feeling incredibly unfit.

There is parking right by the trail, but it's really easy to miss as it can only be accessed from the southbound lane heading towards Victoria. (Here is the exact point on Google Maps if you need it.) There is more parking a little further down on the other side of the road and you can walk up. 

The walk to Niagra Falls only takes a few minutes and in those few minutes you're taken from the side of a busy highway to feeling like you are in one of the most remote places on Earth. The falls are nestled in the corner of a lush valley, with trees forming a canopy over the top of it. If you get there early, you will pretty much have the place to yourselves and that is the best way to see it, because it feels so tranquil. We got there about 10am and there was us, and a family with a dog; when we headed back to the car about 12ish, there were loads of people heading towards the falls.
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Niagra Falls, Goldstream Provincial Park

Niagra Falls in Goldstream Provincial Park on Vancouver Island

Niagra Falls canyon, Goldstream Provincial Park

As we stood there admiring the falls, I felt so relaxed and so happy that three days of being tired and stressed had produced this wonderful moment. We took a few photos, fell off rocks and got our feet wet (that was me...) before I sprung it on Daz that I'd read about a trail up to a railway trestle bridge. The trail to the trestle bridge is not signposted so it took us a couple of minutes to find it. If you're headed away from the falls, as if you're going back to the car, it is on your left hand side. 

Boy, did that trail give us a workout. It is quite steep (170m elevation), and thankfully there are steps but that doesn't make it any less punishing. By the time we'd reached the top, we were convinced we'd destroyed our legs for the rest of the trip. And if your legs aren't already feeling weird, just wait until you stand on that trestle bridge.

Obviously, I should tell you to exercise extreme caution on the trestle bridge because there are gaps and you could seriously injure or kill yourself if you slipped. It's not like it's a knackered old bridge with pieces of wood that are going to break as soon as you step on them like something off Scooby Doo; plenty of people walk across it, but you need to be careful if you do.

View across the trestle bridge in Goldstream Provincial Park

View over the trestle railway bridge in Goldstream Provincial Park

The red railway trestle bridge in Goldstream Provincial Park, Vancouver Island

I am not usually bothered by heights but my legs definitely felt weird and a bit tingly when I started walking across the bridge. For the first time, I could understand what Daz means when he tells me heights make his feet feel weird. I think I made it about a third of the way across before deciding to turn back. I wanted to look over the sides to see the canyon below but I couldn't bring myself to do it.

Like Emerald Lake last year, Niagra Falls and the trestle bridge were a great way to start our adventure and gave us great expectations of what was to come. Of course, it's Canada, that place hasn't got any problems living up to lofty expectations, as you well know from my relentless fangirling about it.

I think it took us maybe two and a half hours to visit the waterfalls and head up to the trestle bridge, though we did take it fairly easy. If you want to find out more about the trestle bridge trail and other trails around it, have a look at Victoria Trails.

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The Trestle Bridge Trail, Goldstream Provincial Park on Vancouver Island

Life

Share the love – July 2017

August 3, 2017

Share The Love July 2017 collage

I really missed not writing a Share The Love post at the end of June, but I was jetlagged and unhappy about being back in England so, I’m sure you can forgive me.

July seems to have whizzed by and at times I’m left wondering whether it was only last month that we were chilling by lakes in Canada. I got confirmation that I am now the proud owner of a BSc (Hons) first class in Forensic Science, *does a little happy dance*. I’m pretty proud of myself for that one. A couple of weeks after we got back from Canada, we spent a few days in Edinburgh, searching for places to live and Daz got himself a job!

Last Monday, my friends from work threw me a surprise leaving party, which was so sweet and I really didn’t know what to say. I was lost for words. We had a brilliant night, played Cards Against Humanity, and ate some delicious brownies one of my friends made, and it was wonderful. I truly am going to miss them so much; I think I might leak from the eyes on my last shift, which will be terribly undignified because I ugly cry.

I’ve also finally plucked up the courage to begin editing our photos from Canada and I immediately realised I was not strong enough because I WANNA GO BACK RIGHT NOW. I’m not going to lie, I fall in love with a lot of places I visit (for a while I was seriously going to Sweden to do a masters, but money) but Canada is like nothing else; it felt like home straight away and England doesn’t entirely feel like home now.

 

BLOG – Hopscotch The Globe

This is one of my favourite travel blogs and YouTube channels. Kristen and Siya are an adventuring couple who produce some of the best travel videos and blogs I’ve seen, and what I think makes them even better is how friendly and chilled out they come across. It feels like you’re listening to friends when you watch their videos. 

Last year, they brought an Airstream and started renovating it. I’ve been eagerly following their progress videos and they finally revealed their incredibly beautiful and spacious looking Airstream in July. I challenge you to watch it and tell me you don’t want to live in an Airstream right away, because I do. I want to move to Canada, renovate an Airstream and explore Canada, and wake up to new forests and mountain views whenever I fancy it.

 

LINKS

 

LISTENING TO

July was an amazing month for new music. While Daz is slowly being subjected to a little less Paramore than in June, it’s still popping up in my playlist a lot. Also popping up is new music from:

  • Kesha; damn, can we talk about how amazing Rainbow is going to be? She has released three singles off her upcoming album and they are all incredible. Take a listen to them here: Praying | Woman | Learn To Let Go
  • LIGHTS; Skydiving is so darn catchy.
  • While we’re talking about eagerly anticipating, I couldn’t not mention that SHANIA TWAIN IS RELEASING A NEW ALBUM IN SEPTEMBER. I cannot wait. I grew up on her music and I cannot wait to hear Now.

I also got into two podcasts this month:

  • Estee Lalonde released the pilot episode of her podcast, The Heart Of It. In the pilot, Estee spoke about protests and I absolutely loved it. I’ve watched her videos for years and her tone of voice is really similar to how she is in her blog and videos, only she gets into important topics.
  • I finally got around to watching Anna and Lily’s podcast, At Home With and it was just so easy to sit down and relax to.

 

WATCHING

All I need to say here is that Game of Thrones is back.

 

POPULAR POSTS ON GIRL IN AWE

 

Now I want to hear about your favourite things from July; send me all the links!

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Ethical and sustainable living, Life

Earth Overshoot Day; changing the way we travel

August 2, 2017
Driving down the Icefields Parkway
 

Today is Earth Overshoot Day; the point in the calendar whereby we have used more natural resources than the planet can renew throughout the whole of the year. That’s a pretty sobering thought when there are almost five months left of 2017.

The Earth Overshoot Day website goes into more detail about what August 2nd represents and some of the things we can do to push that date back. It even allows you to calculate your global footprint. While it isn’t 100% perfect as it doesn’t include many countries on it, you can pick the one closest to you and it gives you some indication of what you could do to reduce your global footprint. According to my results, we would need 4.9 planets to support a world living the same way I do. That was a pretty surprising result as I thought I lived fairly greenly.

A couple of days ago, the UK government announced that it plans to cease sale of petrol and diesel cars (though not hybrid cars) by 2040. In comparison, India wants the same by 2030, and Norway only wants zero emission cars on their roads by 2025. Last month, Volvo announced that they will only introduce electric or hybrid vehicles after 2019. While it requires more work and money for a country to support that kind of change than for a company to stop producing a specific type of car, why is our government planning to fall 21 years behind Volvo, 15 years behind Norway, and 10 years behind India?

No, it’s not as simple as us replacing petrol and diesel cars with electric or hybrid versions, it will require culture shifts and a lot of investment in energy and public transport, but why are we aiming to fall behind?

The government estimate that air pollution is linked to 40,000 premature deaths per year, though it is hard to verify that figure. We know that air quality in some areas is poor, it can make existing conditions worse, and no one really wants to breath in dirty air, period. We know something needs to be done, but are our government doing enough, fast enough? These are just some of the issues that need to be tackled to change the way we think about travel.

Green energy

It’s all well and good harping on about how green electric cars are, but how green are the energy sources charging that car? If an electric car is charged using electric from fossil fuels, it isn’t truly emission free; albeit, the emissions are being emitted from a power station, not the car directly.The UK government is woefully behind other European countries in terms of green energy. A few times a year, stories pop up about the likes of Germany or Sweden generating enough green energy to power the entire country for a day or two. It’s not perfect, but they’re on the right path and we need to follow suit.

The problems with UK public transport

If you’ve traveled to Europe, you will know how inadequate and expensive the British public transport system is in comparison. The UK rail networks are in need of upgrading but that isn’t a priority for the government, who recently scrapped plans to electrify key lines. It seems the only public transport system the government are interested in is HS2, which will tear up parts of the British countryside, will cost £55.7 billion (way above the £32.7bn originally estimated), and will probably be the rail equivalent of the M6 toll; that is, barely used.

We are moving to Edinburgh soon and our friends and family have been doing some research into the easiest and cheapest way to get to Edinburgh, which is about 270 miles from where we currently live. In my car (a 0.9l Renault Clio), it costs less than £30 in fuel one way. The train? Costs over £100. Where is the incentive for people to take public transport instead of their cars when it is so expensive? What’s worse is you could fit five people in the average car, which would drop the cost to £6 each in fuel, but everyone would still be paying £100 on the train.

On top of that, our networks need to expand their reach to encourage more people to take public transport. It takes me just under 20 minutes to drive 7.5 miles to work, but what if I wanted to take public transport? I can’t, safely. I would have to walk a couple of miles down an unlit country lane with no footpath, and it’s doubtful buses would be running when I finish at 1am.

That leads us nicely to cycling. To a lot of motorists, cyclists are considered to be a pain because UK roads aren’t quite wide enough to safely pass. This is even more problematic in rural areas. The Netherlands is a country we really need to learn from because it has been estimated that up to 70% of journeys in Amsterdam and The Hague are made on cycles.

Changing how we travel

Helping our environment does not just require a change in how our government thinks and our infrastructure works, it requires us to change our mindsets. We need to change the way we think about travel. While that does go hand in hand with improved public transport, we need to start walking or cycling more.

I include myself in that category. When we’re living outside Edinburgh, we probably won’t need the car much at all but it seems hard to give up that sense of freedom that comes with owning a car. Conversely, if public transport was better and cheaper, it wouldn’t be as hard.

It isn’t going to be completely pain free and easy, but we haven’t done our fair share in terms of protecting the world we live in for long enough and it’s time we step up and take responsibility.

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Life, Travel

The greatest adventures are with the greatest people

August 1, 2017

Watching the sun set at Moraine Lake, Alberta

In the past 12 months, Daz and I have had our fair share of adventures; we’ve been to Wales, Canada, Edinburgh, and Canada again. Though all of those places are beautiful, it’s the people you’re with that make it the best adventure.

I booked my first trip to Canada before I really knew Daz; I might have known him as “the grumpy pastry chef”. After a few weeks of being together, it became pretty clear to me that I would be moping around Canada on my own, missing him like hell if he didn’t come. In fact, I actually told him that if he didn’t come to Canada, he would ruin my trip to Canada because I would miss him too much. (Soppy, awh.) It’s kinda funny because this time last year he was moping on holiday in Ibiza with his family, and I was being a serious grouch at work.

The fates aligned because he was able to get it off work too, and we found the perfect flight for him which landed just before my flight into Calgary from San Francisco.

During our first trip to Alberta, we felt so at home. We got so much done in seven days (here’s our 7-day Banff & Jasper itinerary), and we were planning our return trip before we’d got to the airport to go home.

We spent months thinking about and planning the trip; whenever one of us was annoyed or stressed, we would remind each other of being back there together. And boy, did that thought get us through a lot of frustrating times.

Our trip was incredible. Even better than we thought it would be, not least because Daz proposed to me at Moraine Lake, our favourite spot (more on that soon). And it definitely sucked more when we had to fly home, though we are now definitely determined to call Canada home one day. 

If either of us had experienced the hammering rain, the chilled out vibes of Tofino, the sounds of Vancouver Island’s rainforests, Vancouver at night, the beauty of the Rockies, or seeing an avalanche on our own, it would have been pretty cool. But to do, see, and experience all of that next to your best friend, is the best feeling in the world.

Sure, travelling with someone isn’t always 100% rainbows, unicorns, and butterflies (I’m really not gonna pretend it is). I’m a miserable moose when I’m tired at the best of times, tired and annoyed at road closures is not a great combination and unfortunate for anyone around me. I’m also always convinced I know the right way (spoiler alert: I almost never do) and am a frustrating co-pilot because I say right when I mean left, and left when I mean right. But then again, nothing is ever 100% rainbows, butterflies, it’s compromise that moves us along (shout out to anyone who gets the Maroon 5 reference – from when they were good).

Daz is my favourite adventure buddy and I’m looking forward to so many more adventures with him and giving him the wrong directions, forever.

Happy birthday, Dazzle.

Who is your favourite adventure buddy?