8 ways we can be more eco-friendly in the bathroom

8 ways to be more eco-friendly in the bathroom

One of my ongoing goals is to be more eco-friendly, which means buying products with less wasteful packaging, products that last longer, products that don’t harm the environment, or contain toxins.

I feel like more and more people are sharing similar goals of being more eco-friendly. Knowing where to start can be a bit overwhelming and baffling.

This blog post was first published last February and I’ve learned so much since then, so I wanted to update the post to share some more eco-friendly awesomeness with you.

 

Get rid of single use products

Rid your bathroom of face wipes, cotton pads and cotton balls, and replace them with long-lasting washable and reusable versions. If you’re feeling particularly crafty there are even tutorials for making your own face scrubbies.

I have a serious issue with plastic waste. It doesn’t degrade and it pollutes every inch of our planet; it litters forest trails, is destroying the ocean, and is in our drinking water. A photographer recently shared this saddening image of a seahorse holding onto a cotton bud. This should not be happening. 

 

Never buy a plastic toothbrush again

Every plastic toothbrush that has ever existed is still sitting there in landfill. That shiz has not biodegraded. Get yourself a wooden toothbrush; it’s exactly the same, only it won’t sit in landfill in and haunt the planet for years to come. If you’re looking for recommendations, we have used Hydrophil and Humble Brush

 

Toothpaste

When I started this journey, toothpaste was perhaps the most bewildering thing for me. Why would toothpaste contain toxins? That did not compute for me.

A quick search online will produce more natural toothpastes, toothpowders and even recipes for making your own toothpastes and powders. As for personal recommendations, I really liked Ecodenta’s charcoal toothpaste. I’m currently trying out toothpowder from The Clay Cure. It’s definitely messier but I feel that it cleans my teeth just as well as toothpaste; whatever works best for you though.

FabLittleBag

FabLittleBag

Sanitary products

We’ve got to talk about it. I was surprised to learn that 60% of tampon users in the UK flush tampons down the toilet. This causes blockages in sewers and can lead to them ending up in rivers and oceans. On top of that, your “standard” tampons and sanitary towels contain a horrendous cocktail of chemicals, including bleach.

I don’t know about you, but I have never considered the need to stick a load of chemicals in my insides. No ta.

Luckily, there are eco-friendly alternatives such as fabric sanitary towels or menstrual cups. While the initial cost is probably more than you would spend on your period in two or three months, you will save money in the long run because you won’t have to repurchase each month.

If you’re too squeamish or grossed out by the thought of getting a bit too hands on or washing sanitary towels out, look for organic cotton products, with biodegradable packaging. And if you’ve been flushing your sanitary products, stop. Should you find yourself worrying about what to do in public toilets without bins, FabLittleBag’s* oxo-biodegradable bags are easy to use and are discreet so you can slip it in the bin outside the stall.

 

Eco-friendly & toxin-free skincare and cosmetics

If your Pinterest page is anything like mine, you don’t have to look hard to find recipes for DIY skincare and makeup.

Unfortunately, our skincare and cosmetic products can be bad for us and the environment due to the array of toxins inside them. I could write an entire blog post on the toxins in skincare and cosmetics (and maybe I will?); if you’re interested in learning more I highly recommend reading There’s Lead In Your Lipstick by Gill Deacon. It’s an eye-opening and seriously informative read that will change the way you look at the contents of your makeup drawer.

There’s good news though! You can make your own skincare and cosmetic products, there are so many recipes floating around the internet, and it’s really fun to make things yourself. There are also a load of companies who sell eco-friendly and people-friendly products. A few of my favourites are;

Toilet roll

Trying to buy eco-friendly toilet roll is one of the biggest headaches of my shopping trip. Primarily because everything seems to come wrapped in non-recyclable plastic packaging. Daz came home from the supermarket the other day and told me he’d spent ages squishing toilet roll packaging in Tesco trying to figure out which wrapping was recyclable. The Padawan is learning. 

Actually finding eco-friendly toilet paper isn’t that hard though, it’s the packaging that’s the issue. Look for recycled toilet roll with the FSC logo and paper made without dyes. Mindful Mum has a really good UK-specific guide for buying more eco-friendly toilet paper.

 

Eco-friendly cleaning products

I actually like cleaning, what I don’t like is the stench of cleaning products lingering in the back of my throat for hours, unnecessary harsh chemicals, and warning signs all over the bottles. You just don’t need it.

If you live in the UK, you might well remember Kim & Aggie’s How Clean Is Your House and their obsession with baking soda, vinegar, and lemon juice, and that’s because it works. A quick search on Pinterest for DIY bathroom cleaners will give you plenty of inspiration and recipes.

I’m yet to actually make my own cleaning products because I can buy eco-friendly cleaning products fairly easily. The two cleaning brands we use in our house at Method and Ecover. You can find both in Tesco and Asda (I think I’ve seen them in Sainsburys too) and they work just as well as the ones full of harsh chemicals.

 

Use less energy and water in the bathroom

Most new toilets are low-flow. You can also install low-flow showerheads, cut down on the time spent in the shower, turn the tap off when you’re not using it, switch to LED lightbulbs, and fix any drips.

 

Have you got any tips for being more eco friendly in the bathroom?

*PR sample – this does not affect or sway my opinion because I cannot be bought! (This was from the original post in 2016.)

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  • This is such a great post with fab ideas, thanks Rosie! I’m definitely a ‘have a quick shower and turn off the tap’ kind of person and I really want to make my own shower gel and bath soak.

    • Thanks, Llinos. Oooh that sounds nice, you’ll have to share the recipe when you try it. See, I’m the kind of person who could stand in a shower for an hour – I usually tend to force myself to have a shower in the morning so I have to make it a quick one.

  • Great post Rosie! Oh my (soon to be) ex-husband was so awful with the water, I remember he would brush his teeth and leave the water faucet running. It would really tick me off. I would have to go in there and shut it off.

    Something I want to do is make my own cleaning products. I need to get on that!

    • Thanks, Jessica. Ohhh that’s so annoying. I’m also one of those people who gets annoyed if someone fills the kettle to the brim to make one hot drink.

      Yes, I tried it one of the recipes for bathroom cleaner and it worked really well.

  • Sarah Albertson

    This is a great post! I started making my own shampoo a while ago and I don’t think I will ever be going back to the store bought kind! Since that was a success I have been really interested in what else I can make myself, I am so intrigued by the homemade toothpaste!

  • I am pretty surprised that people flush tampons in the toilet, but I’m glad there’s a solution out there to help ’em out. If there isn’t a bin in the stall with me, I usually roll a bunch of TP around it and carry it out and toss quickly. We’re all ladies in the restroom, so what’s the big deal? :p

    • I was really surprised by that – I thought it was one of those things that people know they’re not supposed to do.