11 fun and free things to do in Reykjavik, Iceland

It’s true; Reykjavik is an expensive city (especially if you’re British because the exchange rate is so bad for us). Luckily, there are plenty of free things you can do while exploring Iceland’s capital city.

 

Reykjavik street art magic rainbow unicorn

Admire some weird and wonderful street art [Read: 10 pieces of Reykjavik street art you need to see & where to find it]

Reykjavik has a reputation for it’s street art. It’s plentiful and it is all kinds of weird and beautiful.

You really don’t have to look far to find it either because you’ll find some of it adorning shop fronts down Laugavegur, you’ll catch glimpses of it down side streets, and if you go wandering you’ll find it decorating neighbourhoods.

Reykjavik street art I miss you, I miss the smell of your hair

My personal favourite was this really simple but powerful piece. I saw it and these whole waves of the feels hit me.

 

 

Reykjavik Harpa

See the city from Harpa

Impossible to miss, Harpa is Reykjavik’s concert and exhibition hall. While the events are ticketed, anyone can wander into the building, and up the stairs to see the city from a height.

The building itself is really pretty, with oddly shaped windows, some of which are tinted, which make for a nice pattern against the city.

 

Reykjavik sea wall at sunrise

Walk along the sea wall

Once you’ve visited Harpa, take a left out of the building and walk along the seawall where you can let the crisp air hit your face and take in views of Mount Esja.

 

 

Sun voyager, Reykjavik

Photograph sun voyager

This sculpture on the seawall is one of the most touristy spots in the city. I mean, it’s easy to see why; it’s a beautiful sculpture depicting a ship with the sea and Mt Esja in the background. And if you go down at sunrise or sunset, your bound to get a brilliant photo. Though you might have to wait your turn because everyone wants a photo in front of it.

 

Reykjavik walking tour Tjornin

Take a free walking tour [Read: Discover Reykjavik on a free walking tour from CityWalks]

CityWalks offer a very popular two-hour walking tour around Reykjavik, covering the history of the city and the Icelandic culture. From personal experience I can tell you that this tour is absolutely worth it and is a brilliant way to see and learn about the city.

This tour is listed as free, as it doesn’t have any kind of ticket price, and you basically pay what you think the tour is worth. Technically, it’s free as you don’t have to pay your guide anything. But if you do pay your guide, it’s probably one of the cheapest activities you can do in Reykjavik and is certainly worth it.

 

Reykjavik snowy Tjornin

Stroll around Tjornin

Tjornin is the park next to city hall, where you can take a nice leisurely stroll around a lake and enjoy looking at the nice neighbourhoods around it.

 

Map of Iceland in Reykjavik city hall

Get up close with Iceland…and a vagina?

Ok, so I’m going to start on the one that caught your attention here; the vagina. So, Iceland’s mayor decided that the best way to celebrate 100 years of women being allowed to vote in Iceland was to unveil some artwork depicting a vagina. It’s not immensely obscene and to be honest I probably wouldn’t have realised what it was had I not been told.

I mean, I kinda see the major’s idea; people don’t say the word ‘vagina’ all that often and look you’ve read it four times in the last minute! On the other hand, it doesn’t seem like the most progressive way to stop sexism but Reykajvik does also have a penis museum, so I guess it balances out. Plus, it is a very liberal city.

Once you’ve gotten over that, take a look at the huge 3D map of Iceland.

 

Get a panoramic view at the Perlan

The viewing deck of the Perlan offers 360 degree views of the surrounding area, making it a perfect place to get a really good view of the city. (The best place is probably Hallgrimskirkja right in the city, but that’s not free.) It’s completely free to get to the viewing deck, but there is a restaurant and a cafe if you fancy a bite to eat.

 

Reykjavik Hallgrimskirkja

Admire Hallgrimskirkja

While it will cost you to get up to the top of Hallgrimskirkja, walking around it and admiring the church is completely free. You can also go inside the church for free. If you do want to get up to the top, get there early or prepare to queue.

 

Seeing the northern lights in Reykjavik

See the northern lights

If the conditions are right, it’s possible to see lady aurora from the city. We headed down to the sea wall on a clear night, when good solar activity was forecast (you’ll find the aurora forecast website handy), and we were rewarded with a patch of green in the sky.

It was hard to spot at first, and to begin with I wasn’t sure if it was a cloud and my brain was playing tricks on me and turning it green. But no. The green got stronger and we saw it for about 10 minutes. Unfortunately, I had broken my tri-pod the day before so my photos were not great (as you can see).

When it comes to the lights, it really is about having the perfect weather conditions, especially if you’re in a city where light pollution can make them even harder to see.

If you’re a keen photographer and want to head out of the city on a trip to see the lights, I cannot recommend Arctic Shots enough & you can read about my experience on their northern lights tour here.

 

Spot the Yule Lads

If you’re visiting Reykjavik during the festive period, make sure to keep your eye out for the Yule Lads being projected onto buildings.

The Yule Lads are part of Icelandic folklore. There are 13 of them and 13 days before Christmas, one comes into town each night.

Over Christmas, the Yule Lads can be seen projected onto buildings, which makes a pretty fun kinda treasure hunt; especially if you’ve got kids.

 

Would you add anything else to the list?

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domkirkjan church reykjavik

One of the best ways to find out about a destination is to speak with the locals; and that’s exactly what happens on CityWalks’ free walking tour of Reykjavik.

While my Mum and I were researching what to do in Reykjavik, we came across CityWalks on TripAdvisor. With so many rave reviews, it looked like a great way to explore the city and figure out what else we wanted to do while we were there.

Iceland's parliament building in Reykjavik

We met our guide Sara, a history graduate and local teacher, outside the parliament building; which, by the way, looks very understated in comparison to parliament buildings in other countries. With it being so early, and so cold, we didn’t really expect many other people to be on the tour with us, but there must have been about 25 people. Despite that, we had no problem hearing what Sara was saying and our experience wasn’t at all affected by it being a larger group of people than we expected.

While the snow fell outside the parliament building, Sara told us about the relationship between the Icelandic government and the Icelandic people, and it sounds like a pretty good one. When they were unhappy that their president was involved in the Panama Papers, they protested outside parliament and he stepped down. When Icelandic bankers were naughty in 2008 and fudged stuff up for everyone, Icelanders took to the square with pots and pans, and made a racket. And do you know what? It worked; they held bankers accountable and jailed them.

Tjornin, Reykjavik

From there, we headed to Tjornin, a popular park in the centre of Reykjavik. Thankfully, Tjornin is right next to the Town Hall, which provided us with some much needed warmth for a few minutes.

A yellow house in Reykjavik

Houses in Reykjavik

An elf rock in Reykjavik

Sara took us for a wander through some of Reykjavik’s prettiest neighbourhoods and explained a little about elves. In Iceland, some people believe in elves and being the nice, friendly country Iceland is, people accept and respect the wishes of elves.

When construction was being carried out in a neighbourhood, they came across a rock (yep, it’s that rock in the photo above – doesn’t look that big, huh?) that couldn’t be moved and all the machinery broke. There was no physical reason that they were unable to move the rock, so they decided it was an elf rock and that they needed to respect the elves wishes, and simple moved the construction project somewhere else. How nice!

A street in Reykjavik

Our tour covered other things such as their love for hot dogs, and how much natural energy the country has. Studies have found that even if there were 2 million people living in Iceland (there are around 323,000), they have enough resources for free heating indefinitely. Unfortunately I can’t actually find the source of that comment, but as an environment science fan I got so excited by the mere thought of it.

Harpa, Reykjavik, in a snowstorm

The windows in Harpa, Reykjavik

View over Reykjavik from Harpa

Typical to Icelandic weather, we got caught in a very sudden snowstorm and rushed to Harpa, their concert hall, for warmth. There, Sara continued to tell us about what it’s like to live in Iceland, and it sounds wonderful.

Iceland is a very progressive, welcoming, and open society. They have no military presence, are impartial, and no longer have foreign military bases on their island, as they believed it hypocritical to their peaceful nature. Higher education is very accessible, they seem to have a pretty decent healthcare system, your nationality, religion, or sexual preference doesn’t matter, and there’s a website to find out if you slept with a relative the night before as the population is so small. What more do you even want from a country? In short, Iceland is probably what most people would like their own country to be more like.

If you’re headed to Reykjavik and want to get your trip off to the best start, I cannot recommend CityWalks enough. Though the tour is advertised as free, you can obviously tip the guides. They do also do some other tours, which are paid for; you can find out about those on their website.

Have you ever been on a walking tour?

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Exploring Reykjavik with CityWalks free walking tour

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10 pieces of Reykjavik street art you need to see and where to find it

Reykjavik might not be the kind of city you’d associated with a big street art scene, but you cannot miss the colourful, and slightly bizarre, pieces plastered on shop fronts, peeking out from alleyways, and on the pavement.

This post is by no means an extensive list at all; it’s just the coolest stuff I saw that I think you should see too. I Heart Reykjavik lists some other great pieces.

According to Iceland Review, graffiti on public property is considered vandalism and is, as such, forbidden. Howe

Magical intergalactic rainbow unicorn

There is no better way to start any list of any kind than with an intergalactic rainbow unicorn, and my Mum is sure some kind of Davie Bowie reference needs to be added to that description too. We spotted this near Reykjavik’s city hall.

Where to see it: Near city hall, down Sudurgata. The exact location is here, and it’s the green building on Google Maps.

 

Reykjavik street art

Where to find them: You will spot the Reykjavik Design March piece on the end of a building on Vonarstraeti, and then the stamp piece will be right in front of you then; you can actually see that one on Google Maps too.

Godzilla and Bender attack Reykjavik

King Kong Reykjavik

Ok, so maybe this piece is my joint favourite. If Godzilla attacking Reykjavik isn’t cool enough on it’s own, Futurama’s Bender is also at it. And King Kong is just chilling round the corner.

Where to see it: About half way up Laugavegur; you can’t miss it.

 

Isey, Reykjavik

And while you’re searching for Godzilla and Bender, there’s no way you can miss Isey all painted pretty.

Where to see it: Isey on Laugavegur.

 

I love the detail and vastness of this piece. There’s just so much to look at, and I’m not entirely sure “what the message is”, but I like it.

Where to see it: Down Freyjugata. This is the exact location, but on Google Maps the building is blue and covered in ‘standard’ graffiti.

We won't be like them Reykjavik

I miss the smell of your hair reykjavik

This one really got to me. It’s just the simplicity of it; when I read it I could just feel someone’s longing, and since I wasn’t there with Daz and missed him, it got to me.

Where to see it: These are just a little down the road from the piece above, and on the end of a building that goes down the Valastigur alley. Again, this is the exact location but Google Maps is out of date. If you walk a few more metres down Valastigur, you’ll see a couple more pieces.

Wild Welva Reykjavik

I was really taken aback when I saw this piece; it’s just so detailed, and it reminded me of Rafiki from The Lion King. When I got home and did some research, the detail made sense. This piece was created by Wild Welva, a Spanish street artist, who first creates his work on paper and then pastes them onto walls. You can find out more about his work on his Facebook page

Where to see it: Keep going down from the magic hand piece towards Tjornin and you will come across this on the side of a building. This is the exact location, but the wall is just white on Maps.

Marley Coffee Reykjavik

Where to see it: Marley Coffee on the corner of Grettisgata.

Where’s the best street art you’ve seen?

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Share The Love November 2017 collage

I know, I know, November was a bit of a quiet month around here; assignment deadlines crept up on me and then all of a sudden I had no time to blog. I’m trying to get back into it for December and want to plan in advance in case things get hectic around Christmas. 

November was a lot of research and writing. I had two 3,000 word essays, which isn’t that much for me to write (thanks, years of taking part in NaNoWriMo!); it’s the research and refining bit that takes the time. 

I got most of my Christmas shopping sorted, and some of it is all wrapped up – it looks like a six year old wrapped them, but they’re wrapped. Apart from that, Daz and I have been playing Horizon Zero Dawn, which is pretty excellent, though we keep calling the main character Alloy or Aioli. I’m also putting all my effort into not buying The Sims 4 on console until my exams are over. 

The past few weeks have treated us to some incredible sunsets. I’m not sure if it’s the time of year, or there are just better sunsets in Scotland, but I feel like at least 4 times a week I’m seeing amazing sunsets. Definitely not complaining. 

A couple of sustainable living posts went live in November, which I’m really proud of and wanted to point you towards if you’ve missed them: how to have a less wasteful Christmas and 8 reasons why you should produce less rubbish.

 

Blog – Kalyn Nicholson

I think this is a first; I’m listing a YouTube channel this month instead of a blog. Kalyn does have a blog too and she did just recently post about 10 TV shows worth binging, which is spot on. I found Kalyn’s channel a couple of months back and she’s become an autowatch YouTuber and that is something for me. I don’t think there’s anyone else whose videos I will always watch. 

Kalyn’s videos have a nice, chill vibe; her editing is en pointe, and her videos are chock full of legit useful tips and inspiration. Plus, Bentley is adorable as. Watch one of her videos and tell me you don’t want to light about a hundred candles and throw on some comfy clothes? I dare you. 

Links

Listening

When I wrote October’s Share The Love post, I was truly expecting this section to just be me fangirling about Taylor Swift. I only really liked Ready For It before the album came out, but I was expecting myself to get swept up once I heard the album in full and just love it. Nope. Sadly, that did not happen. I just don’t like the new style. I respect her for changing, I won’t knock that, I just don’t like her new sound, and I’m gutted about that because I’ve been a fan since Love Story was released.

I do like Don’t Blame Me and I Did Something Bad, but the rest of it is quite forgettable for me. And the less I say about End Game, the better. 

My Autumn Bop playlist has had a slight update, but not much. A couple of weeks ago, I started listening to the podcast S Town and it is brilliant. If you loved Serial, you will love S Town even more because the storytelling is outstanding. I can’t remember exactly when I finished off You Are A Badass by Jen Sincero (might have been the end of October, I dunno); the audiobook is well worth a listen and I fully attribute listening to that to Kalyn’s videos, too. 

 

Watching

Really having to wrack my brains for this one because we haven’t been watching a huge amount of TV, aside from Blue Planet 2. How incredible is the cinematography on that? We’ve mostly been playing Horizon Zero Dawn when we’d be watching TV. 

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December Goals

Report on November goals

In November I wanted to finish off my masters dissertation plan, do yoga at least three times a week, and read more. I did not finish my masters dissertation plan because it took me a while to find time to sit down with my tutor to hack things out. I’m definitely closer to finishing it though, which is great. Yoga fell off when I stopped scheduling it, so it seems I need to schedule it to actually do it. And I read a little more this month but not as much as I wanted. 

 

December goals

  • Finish masters dissertation plan; my exams are before Christmas, which gives me some time to finish things off. 
  • Be prepared with my blog; I want to get the posts going up around Christmas scheduled in advance so I’m not rushing and taking time out of enjoying Christmas. 
  • Schedule in and do yoga; scheduling it seems to work really well for me, so I need to do that again because I still love those yoga pants and want them in my life. But I’m putting my foot down with myself; it ain’t happening unless I’m doing it regularly. 

 

Phew. That felt like a long one. Ok, you go: tell me about how November was for you and what your goals are for December.

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A red house/barn in Iceland's Snaefellsnes Peninsula in December

Midday sunrise at the Snaefellsnes Peninsula during December
 

It's been almost a year since my Mum and I went to Iceland and by far one of the highlights was our trip to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula with Gateway to Iceland.

 

Since we were visiting in December, neither of us really fancied braving driving in the snow in a foreign country. I mean, it takes about 4mm to bring the UK to a halt - what do we know about winter driving? Aside from "argh, a snowflake, let's drive at 2 miles an hour."

 

We knew we wanted to see more than just Reykjavik and we were absolutely spoilt for choice, because it's Iceland and the whole country is so darn stunning, moody, and photogenic. In the end, we settled on a day trip to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula with Gateway to Iceland. I promise, this is not a sponsored post; there is just going to be a lot of fangirling about Gateway to Iceland because they are probably the best trip provider I've ever been with.

A house in front of Snaefellsjokull, Snaefellsnes Peninsula

Snaefellsjokull in Iceland's Snaefellsnes Peninsula during December

Snaefellsjokull viewed across a frozen lake in December

Our driver and tour guide for the day, Stefan, picked us up nice and early and we escaped from the nippy December morning onto a cosy, heated bus and headed out of the city. If you end up on a day trip with Stefan you are in for a treat. The guy has a voice that could melt butter and is so knowledgeable. Seriously, his voice is on par with Morgan Freeman or David Attenborough's.

 

He spent the day telling us about the history of Iceland and Snaefellsnes. I could have listened to him speak for days - he's a fantastic storyteller and seemed to know pretty much anything there is to know about Iceland.

 

I can't remember exactly how many people were on the trip with us - Gateway To Iceland's website says no more than 19 people on this trip, and I think there might have been just shy of that.

Iceland's golden glow morning sunrise in Snaefellsnes Peninsula
Snowy Icelandic mountains

The place we stopped for lunch on Gateway to Iceland's Snaefellsnes Peninsula tour

Rock formations on a beach in Snaefellsnes Peninsula

 

As well as visiting the Gerðuberg basalt columns (the winter morning light was so dreamy and Instagram-worthy there), Arnarstapi, Snaefellsjokull, and the famous Kirkjufell mountain, Stefan squished in a couple of extra stops too. He even went the extra mile to drop us off somewhere different on the way back into Reykjavik so we could make our evening northern lights trip, which was rescheduled last minute. (It was a tight squeeze, which we definitely did not plan on - but that's a risk you take with Icelandic weather.)

Golden sunlight in Iceland during December

A black sand beach in Iceland's Snaefellsnes Peninsula in December

A few tips if you're headed to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula

  • Don't be an idiot like me and forget your camera battery charger - you're gonna take loads of photos
  • Don't forget a spare memory card, either 
  • Take a tripod - because of the short daylight hours we arrived at Kirkjufell in darkness, and know you're gonna want to capture somewhere White Walkers and Jon Snow have been, right?
  • Take a spare snuggly jumper/jacket to wear on the bus in case it’s raining/snowing and you don't want to be sitting in a wet coat (the bus was nice and toasty, don't worry about that, but you still don't want to be sitting in a soggy coat)
  • Wear waterproof shoes/boots
  • Get plenty of sleep the night before because you are not going to want to fall asleep at any point during the day

Kirkjufell, Snaefellsnes Peninsula

If you're heading to Iceland, I cannot recommend Gateway to Iceland and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula tour enough. We did use another trip provider while we were in Iceland and they were shocking in comparison to Gateway To Iceland. (If you're going to Iceland and want to know who to avoid, I will tell you via email or social media. I refuse to give them any kind of SEO benefit.)

The 'problem' with Iceland is that the winter and summer produce such contrasting landscapes - so if you visit in one season, you have to go back and see what it looks like in the other. December provides some truly beautiful insta-worthy golden light whenever it is actually light. When I do find my way back to Iceland, I'll use Gateway To Iceland in an instant. If you're visiting before May 2018, Gateway to Iceland do have a discount on this trip - it's not sponsored (pinky promise), I just really want you to use them and have a fab time. 

Have you ever been to Iceland or the Snaefellsnes Peninsula?

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12 photos to inspire you to visit Iceland's Snaefellsnes Peninsula

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Share The Love October 2017 edition

What’s this; a post on a Monday? I can’t even remember the last time I posted on a Monday. I had this post all written, but forgot to sort a photo and schedule it for last Thursday. So here it is; my belated October edition of Share The Love. 

I had a lightbulb moment about my thesis idea a couple of weeks ago and I’m really excited about where it might lead me. While juggling everything else, I’ve also started looking into PhDs because it turns out I need to apply pretty damn soon. On the theme of university, we took a field trip to a nearby wind farm which was really fun. Ironically, it was not very windy so the turbines weren’t moving but I kinda love wind turbines so it was nice to get up close to one. I’m pretty sure that could be the geekiest thing I’ve ever said on this blog but, idk; I love me some renewable energy. No, that’s the geekiest thing I’ve ever said. 

Daz and I also had a few local adventures and have discovered some wonderful beaches nearby – and visited one of them three times in just as many weeks. 

My Mum and Nan came to visit for a couple of days which was lovely because it had been two months since we last saw my Nan. Daz’s Mum and partner came up over the weekend and we had a lovely, relaxing couple of days. It was nice to catch up in person and spend some time relaxing and exploring the city more. It’s been a good couple of weeks for that. 

Towards the end of October, I decided I needed to start doing yoga again because I haven’t really done any exercise (apart from walking) since we moved. I know how good yoga is for keeping my stress levels down so I’m scheduling time in to get some done, and I’m noticing an improvement in my stress levels already. 

 

Blog – My Lovelier Days

I found My Lovelier Days two or three months ago, and it’s a brilliant mix of travel posts and inspiring and thoughtful posts. Diana has a wonderfully inspiring way of writing and her recent post about trusting yourself is one of my favourites. Her photography is brilliant as well; the travel photos are stunning and her other photos have such a nice, cosy vibe. 

 

Links 

 

Listening 

The music I’ve been listening to this month isn’t much different to September’s, to be honest. I’m still hooked on everything that came out a few weeks ago. I put together a playlist for when I’m doing university work or when I want to get stuff done and I love it. If you want to listen to it, here’s my autumn bop playlist

 

Watching

Since university work is ramping up, I’ve managed to be fairly disciplined at not watching quite so many Friends re-runs. We’ve been watching the IT Crowd (never gets old), The Little Mermaid, and I’ve even had the chance to actually watch some Formula One; it’s been so long since either one of us felt some kind of up to date with F1. I find that somewhat bittersweet as two and a half years ago, it was my life and wanted I wanted to do. 

 

Goals

I thought it would be fun to add in a goals section so we can talk about the goals we want to achieve in the next month, talk about how we’re progressing with our goals, and help each other. Sound good? 

Since this is the first month I’m doing it, I’m not going to include a goals progress section, but I will do next month. 

November goals

  • Finish my masters thesis plan; I need to start contacting potential PhD supervisors if I want to start one next September, so I need to nail down my masters thesis plan and outline what I could expand upon during a PhD. 
  • Do yoga at least three times a week; As I mentioned in the intro, I’m feeling the benefits of doing yoga again so I want to try and do it at least three times a week. I’ve decided that if I can keep that up for a couple of months, I’ll reward myself with a new pair of yoga pants (how beautiful are they?) but only if I keep it up for two months. No slacking allowed. 
  • Read more; I took part in Cosy Reading Night a couple of weeks ago and it was so nice to dedicate three hours to reading something that wasn’t a journal article. It’s something I spoke about in my self-care post and it makes my mind feel so much more open and free – maybe that sounds weird, but it makes sense to me. 

Ok, definitely let me know what your goals are for November too!

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What did you enjoy in October? Tell me about your goals; let’s help each other and hold each other accountable 🙂 

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Share The Love - September 2017

Are you fed up of hearing that autumn is finally here yet? Ok, I won’t say it – but I’m definitely thinking it and I’m really excited about it.

September was our first full month living in Edinburgh, and it’s been a great month. We’re getting our bearings, are loving living here, work is good, and my masters is equal parts fascinating and horrifying. NB: we’re fudging the planet big time and need to stop being dicks to it.

In September, I decided to give being fully vegan another go and it’s going really well so far. We’ve made some delicious vegan food, like soup and butternut squash “mac n cheese”. 

 

Blog – What Is Maria

I found Maria’s blog towards the end of September and it fast became a favourite. Maria covers a range of topics, such as vegan food and recipes, anxiety, and overcoming exercise addiction to name a few.

What drew me to her blog was how absolutely honest it feels. It feels like you’re talking to her in person. She isn’t trying to be someone else at all. My favourite blog post from September was her top 10 vegan pantry essentials.

 

Links

 

Listening

September was an amazing month for new music.

 

Watching

Our TV signal is rubbish where we live, so Daz and I have been watching a lot of Friends re-runs and documentaries on Netflix / iPlayer. We really enjoyed BBC’s Life at the Extreme, Chasing Coral (it’s a hard watch), and being the Canadaphiles we are, we chuckled hard at Being Canadian.

Like most of the UK, we are pretty undecided on our feelings towards Channel 4’s Great British Bake Off. On one hand, it’s a baking show; what isn’t to love. On the other hand, it belongs on BBC and WHERE’S IS MARY BERRY?! At least it isn’t as bad as the reboot of Top Gear.

 

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What did you enjoy in September?

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