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5 reasons why you need to read Blood & Earth by Kevin Bales

May 11, 2017

Blood and Earth by Kevin Bales

It’s been a long time since I’ve written a book review, eh? I’ve barely had time to read this year but Blood and Earth demanded I read it with some kind of immediacy and then tell everyone that they need to read it too. 

 

1. You don’t know what you don’t know

I can’t speak for everyone but I went into this book thinking I knew about where things were coming from but I was wrong. I was shocked by a lot of the things I read. I had no clue that shrimps were harvested by young boys and men who had been lied to, enslaved, abused, and forced to live in awful conditions with the threat of death if they tried to escape back to their families. I honestly would never have made the logical leap from shrimp farming to slavery. Never.

It is very easy for us to buy into marketing and what we are told by retailers without ever questioning the origin of our phones, laptops, food, or clothes. It’s easy to be ignorant because you don’t have to ask that many questions before you feel very uncomfortable.

 

2. It is our responsibility to know where things come from

By buying a product we are, whether we like it or not, agreeing with the practices of a company we buy from. Large, global retailers don’t really care about anything aside from profit and to force them to change their profit needs to suffer.

This leaves us with the reponsibility of holding companies accountable with you and me. By actually asking companies to change and voting with our money we can make companies aware of the way we feel about their actions. More transparency is needed and until we demand it most retailers probably won’t feel obliged to provide it.

 

3.We kinda like the planet

The kind of scum who value profit above people’s lives are also the kind of people who don’t care about the environment.

Mining for gold has resulted in streams and rivers being polluted with mercury, which local families use drink, wash in, or use for cooking. Would we stand for that happening in our own towns? No.

The demand for charcoal has resulted in large chunks of forests being decimated and ecosystems destroyed, resulting in not just loss of species but severe flooding in local areas because the forests “held” the water.

Mangrove forests are being destroyed in x for shrimp farming. The problem with this is, again, not just related to the ecosystems and species being wiped out, but mangrove forests are also huge carbon sinks. When they’re destroyed, that CO2 is released into the atmosphere.

None of these are positives and Kevin Bales does an incredible job of explaining the link between slavery and the destruction of the environment. He states that if you combined the CO2 pollution of global slavery, it would be the third biggest polluter behind America and China. If not for humane reasons, slavery needs to be stopped.

 

4. It will change your life

This might sound cliche but you will struggle not to question your buying choices or retailers actions after reading this. And that is perfect and exactly what the world needs.

In one of the last chapters, Kevin shares the story of Claudio and Maria; two environmentalists who lived on their farm in Brazil and taught others how to live and make money off their farms without being destructive. Disgustingly, they (along with hundreds of others) were killed because they stood in the way of people who wanted to destroy the forests for profit. The loss of their lives can’t be in vain and who wants us to be sitting around in years to come and think we should have taken action sooner?

 

5. Our governments are idiots and we need to make them change

Ok, so let me preface this by saying not all governments are idiots. The UK and US governments seem especially moronic and ignorant when it comes to the environment at the moment. In America, you have a President who thinks climate change has been invented. In the UK, we are in the run up to a general election and the current party in power aren’t talking about the environment at all in their manifesto. In the UK, the capital city breached annual legal pollution limits for 2017 after just five days. And, the UK government has failed on repeated occasions to clean up the air in London, despite thousands deaths as a result of it. This is not acceptable.

The more of us who are educated, the more we can force change.

I’m not going to lie, this isn’t a happy Sunday afternoon read but it is an important read that shouldn’t be ignored, no matter how bad it makes us feel. I did actually find Blood and Earth to be a really gripping read because I just needed to know more immediately. Despite all the horror, it’s an inspiring read to know that we are responsible and can force change.

I’d also like to point out that I’m not suggesting that if we all read this book things will change instantly and it’ll be a walk in the park, full of sunshine, bunny rabbits and fluffy clouds. This book isn’t a silver bullet, it’s a starting point. It will be hard to change our society and the things we take for granted, and have become so reliant on. No one said change was supposed to be easy but if we want to ensure slavery is wiped out, want to enjoy the natural beauty of this planet, and continue sharing it with wonderful species that are vital to the ecosystem, we have to try.

If you’re intrigued by Blood and Earth, or want to know more, you might also like to read Kevin Bales’ interview with NPR (it’s written so you don’t need audio).

If you’ve got any suggestions for environmental / ethical reads, please send them my way.

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Books, Travel

A spot of airplane reading | eBook haul

August 28, 2016

I’ve not had time to read much during the past few months, but with 20 hours of flying time soon coming up I will definitely be reaching for my Kindle to pass the time.

Though I’ve got a pretty packed 12 days planned, I’m hopeful that I’ll have some time to sit down and enjoy the view with a book in my hand, or maybe when I’m all cosy in the tent.

The Dream Thieves - Maggie Stiefvater

The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle #2) – Maggie Stiefvater

Considering how much I enjoyed The Raven Boys, I can’t believe it’s taken me a year and a half to get around to reading The Dream Thieves. To be honest, I did start it pretty much straight after I finished The Raven Boys but hit a reading slump and didn’t want to force myself to read it and end up not loving it as much as I know I would.

 

A Court of Mist and Fury - Sarah J Maas

A Court of Mist and Fury (ACOTAR #2) – Sarah J. Maas

I read A Court of Thorns and Roses last year and loved the world building, but was a little disappointed in the lack of action. However, I did love the last third and I need to know what happens next, especially with Rhysand. A Court of Mist and Fury is a bit of a beast and is about twice the size of ACOTAR, so I’m hoping it’s an action packed 600-odd pages, and not more room for little action.

 

The Girl At Midnight - Melissa Grey

The Girl at Midnight – Melissa Grey

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you probably know how obsessed I am with Magonia and I almost bought the Kindle version of it so I could read it with glee at 30,000 feet. I was about to buy it when I spotted the ‘people also buy’ section and saw The Girl at Midnight.

I was completely sold at “Beneath the streets of New York City live the Avicen, an ancient race of people with feathers for hair and magic running through their veins.” Underground New York, feathery hair, and magic? What more do I need from a book?

 

What have you been reading this summer?

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Books

Sometimes all the ‘how to get out of a reading slump’ tips don’t work, and that’s ok

May 6, 2016

Four books on the go

I’ve been stuck in a bit of a reading rut for most of 2016 so far. That’s not to say I haven’t read some great books though, but I’ve struggled to find time to really get into books.

At the time of writing this, I have four books on the go:

  • Allegiant Collector’s Edition – Veronica Roth: I’ve been reading this since it came out in October, and I’m pretty sure I’ve not finished it yet because of the ending.
  • Glass Sword – Victoria Aveyard: I’m over half way through this and really enjoying it, but meh, the reading rut.
  • Carry On – Rainbow Rowell: if anyone can bring me out of a reading rut, it’s Rainbow Rowell, so I started this in the hope it would pull me out.
  • Wild Swans – Jessica Spotswood

There are thousands and thousands of blog posts floating about sharing tips on how to get out of a reading rut. But sometimes, all the tips in the world don’t work and you just need to give it time.

I keep scrolling through Instagram (shameless plug, you can find me here @eatreadglam) and getting all excited about people’s enthusiasm for something they’ve just read, or something they’re about to read, and wishing I felt the same. That said, I am having a hard time not buying A Court of Mist and Fury right now BECAUSE IT LOOKS SO BEAUTIFUL AND SURELY BEAUTIFUL BOOKS WILL PULL ME OUTTA THIS FUNK. RIGHT?

WRONG. The reason I’m stuck in a reading rut is because I’ve got so much going on with university and my job. I have never been one of those people who can steal five minutes with a book here and there. I’m one of those people who gets fully invested and sucked in and will not be moved from the sofa for at least an hour, and finding a spare hour feels increasingly hard at the moment.

There’s no point forcing it because I know I won’t enjoy what I’m reading if I do that, and my second year is almost at an end, so I’ll have time to read over the summer.

Sometimes, you have to ignore all the tips and just wait; just wait until you get that time when the house is quiet, there’s nothing gnawing at the back of your mind reminding you to do something, and you can relax and fall into someone else’s head.

 

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Books, Books Posts That Aren't Reviews

5 types of friends who want to borrow your books

April 22, 2016

5 types of people who want to borrow your books

For bookworms, there are few things more exciting than recommending books to your friends. BUT lending to friends comes with perils because there five types of people who want to borrow your books.

The hogger

This pesky friend will get all excited when you talk to them about a book you love and will declare that they want to read it right away. You will immediately hesitate, squint your eyes at them, and your brain will ask you if you can trust this person with your beloved. Their enthusiasm will convince you that they’ll read it quickly and give it back to you within a couple of weeks, so you’ll tentatively hand over your book.

A week later, you’ll ask how they’re getting on with it and they’ll say something like, “I haven’t got around to reading it yet, but I’m going to make a start this weekend.”

At this point, your brain will go “I told you so” in a singsong voice and you’ll tell it to shut up.

The weeks go by and the same answer keeps coming. Every time you go around their house, you’ll see it sat on the shelf, collecting dust and not looking like it’s next to be read.

Eventually, after a year passes, you’ll go to their house and rescue it. Maybe you’ll say something, or maybe you’ll say nothing and see how long it takes them to notice, while wondering if it’s illegal to steal something back that is yours. Can you steal your own belongings? I know you can get caught cheating for ‘plagiarizing yourself’, so maybe taking your own things back is stealing.

And the evil voice in your brain will get a slight kick out of the thought of them finally realising it’s missing and stressing out – your brain will call that payback for hogging.

I actually did this once when my friend borrowed The Fault In Our Stars. After a year, I’d had enough and rescued it.

 

The spinebender

You know the one; you’re probably letting out a low growl now just thinking about this.

I like my books to look pristine, even when they’ve been read, and that means not cracking the spine wide open. It’s entirely possible to comfortably read a book without cracking the spine. But the spinebender doesn’t even consider the damage to your bookbabies and will open the book wide open. Maybe they’ll even flatten it out. The horror.

 

The dogearer

I am not the kind of person who somehow manages to prevent anything in my bag from becoming bent or crinkled (I do have friends like that, and I’m 100% sure they’re superhuman) – until it comes to books; I treat books like they are precious, delicate pottery. This friend, though, will show your books no such courtesy.

Your book will return to you looking like someone played football with it; the cover will be creased and pages will be wrinkled.

They’ll say something like, “I only put it in my bag to read at school.” And your brain will go, “And you were attacked by a pack of hungry trolls at school were you?”

 

The snacker

We all love a good snack (or three) while we’re reading, but YOU DON’T EAT SNACKS OVER BOOKS!

This friend will return your book with little presents left buried deep between the pages. Just no.

 

The soulmate

This person seems to be a rarity, and they follow exactly the same rules as you when reading books. They will return your book in the same condition they received them; there’ll be no snacking or dog-eared pages, and you’ll both fangirl or fanboy over it together.  Make a vow to never fall out with this person.

Is there anything you’d add to this list? Tell bookworm horror stories about times you leant books to friends.

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Books, TBR

February Roundup & March TBR

March 4, 2016

February round up and March to be read

Time for a bookish roundup! I finished five books in February, and most of them were absolutely glorious.

 

February roundup

Tell The Wolves I’m Home – Carol Rifka Brunt

This was January’s pick for The Olive Fox Book Club, and I wasn’t overly-thrilled with it, so it took me until the start of February to finish it off. I felt that I couldn’t connect to the characters very well, which meant the whole thing fell quite flat and I didn’t particularly care what happened.

 

Did I Mention I Need You – Estelle Maskame*

Oh, yes, this was good. Did I Mention I Need You helped me get my bookish mojo back.

I wasn’t a huge fan of the first book in the series, Did I Mention I Love You, but all my niggles about that book were not present in this book. I flat out loved it, I’m hooked on the characters and I cannot wait to see what happens in the third book because I neeeeeeed to know what happens with Eden and Tyler.

 

The Perks of Being A Wallflower – Stephen Chbosky (Review on The Olive Fox)

This is one of those books I’ve heard about for years but I’ve always put off reading due to all the hype. When it was chosen as February’s read for The Olive Fox Book Club I was given no choice and had to pick it up. And I’m so glad I did.

It’s been a long time since I started and finished a book in a day – I think Anna and the French Kiss was the last time it happened. I cracked it open first thing in the morning, took it to lunch to read while waiting for my friends, came home and refused to move until I’d reached the end.

I loved the way it was written purely through letters, though I kinda want to know who Charlie was writing too.

 

Crush – Eve Ainsworth*

Much like Perks, Crush was a really gripping read. The characters were well-developed, interesting, and there was quite an important message about domestic abuse. It felt very realistic, and reminded me of a more grown up version of the Jacqueline Wilson novels I used to love as a kid.

 

The Manifesto on How to be Interesting – Holly Bourne

Whoa, this took me a long time to finish. I started The Manifesto on How to be Interesting in November, and it took me until last week to finish it. It’s not really the fault of the book.

It was pretty interesting, and I liked the idea behind it of the main character trying to infiltrate the popular group at school and discovering that guess what they’re actually people too! I liked the premise, there were a lot of good messages in it, but there was something that didn’t quite keep me gripped enough to finish it off faster.

 

March to be read

I set a goal of reading 70 books in 2016, and I’m falling a little behind on that goal so I really need to up my game.

Allegiant Collector’s Edition – Veronica Roth

This is another book that’s taken me a while to finish but I know exactly why; I don’t want to have to re-read the end again. I’ve bribed myself though, and told myself that I cannot read all the extra bits in this until I’ve finished the story – ONWARDS!

 

Glass Sword – Victoria Aveyard

Recently, I was naughty and I bought Glass Sword even though I don’t need it. I probably don’t even need to buy any more books this year, and I’d have enough on my TBR shelf to keep me going, that’s without even thinking about the ARCs. I bought Glass Sword because I keep seeing it on Instagram, and it looks so pretty.

So, I’m making myself read it in March because then I won’t feel so bad about buying it.

 

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets – J. K. Rowling

With The Cursed Child coming out in the summer, I want to re-read the series again. For me, the Chamber of Secrets has always been the book I’ve thought of as my least favourite but every time I read it I always think “HOW COULD I THINK THIS IS MY LEAST FAVOURITE? I LOVE ITTTTT!

 

What have you read recently, and what’s on your TBR list?

Books

Six books I have on pre-order and want to read RIGHT NOW!

February 26, 2016

6 books I have on pre-order

Don’t you just hate that feeling of finishing a book and knowing you have to wait months before you can find out what happens next? That’s been happening to me a lot recently. 

When I pre-ordered The Cursed Child the other day, I realised that I’d got six books on pre-order in total. SIX BOOKS ON PRE-ORDER! That has never happened before. It seems that there are so many books coming out this year that I just cannot wait to get my hands on.

Warning: I’ma mention the word ‘love’ a hella lot in this blog posts. Sorry, not sorry.

 

Kindred Spirits – Rainbow Rowell | February 25th, 2016

Kindred Spirits is a 96-page release for World Book Day 2016 that follows Star Wars fangirl Elena as she queues up to watch the latest Star Wars film.

I absolutely adore Rainbow’s writing; her characters are so detailed and real. I always finish her books feeling like I actually know the characters. She is an autobuy author for me.

After reading and loving Fangirl, I’m looking forward to see what she might do with a Star Wars fangirl.

 

The Glittering Court – Richelle Mead | April 5th, 2016

This has been described as a mix between Elizabethan and frontier worlds; what is not to love about that? The Glittering Court is a kind of finishing school for for ‘impoverished girls’ – you guys know how I feel about books that involve boarding schools. (I’m just assuming it’s a boarding school here.)

I’ve read and enjoyed the first three Vampire Academy books, so I’m sure that I’ll enjoy this.

 

The Crown (The Selection #5) – Kiera Cass | May 3rd, 2016

This is the second book in The Selection reboot (fifth book overall), and I WANT TO READ IT RIGHT NOW! The cliffhanger at the end of The Heir was cruel and I need to know what happens next.

A lot of people seemed to find Eadlyn irritating, but I quite liked her; it was nice to read a character who was unashamedly imperfect.

 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany | July 31st, 2016

I’m not sure I even need to say a lot about this.

The play has been advertised as ‘the eighth installment’ in the series, but I’m going to try not to think about the book like that since it isn’t actually a novel, it’s a copy of the script that will be used when the play is first shown later this year. That said, I’ve been waiting to find out what happened to Harry, Ron and Hermoine for years, so I’m sure I’ll love it.

 

The Midnight Star (The Young Elites #3) – Marie Lu | October 11th, 2016

With each book I read by Marie Lu, I fall in love with her even more. When I didn’t think she could beat the Legend series, she released The Young Elites. When I didn’t think that could be beaten, I fell harder for The Rose Society.

Her world building is so wonderful; she creates these wonderful and elaborate places, that you just sink into like a cosy bed at the end of a long, hard day.

The Rose Society took a very dark turn and I’m looking forward to seeing how the series comes to an end.

 

Aerie (Magonia #2) – Maria Dahvana Headley | November 3rd, 2016

I almost hyperventilated when I saw how stunning the cover for Aerie is. LOOK AT HOW BEAUTIFUL IT IS! I have fangirled about Magonia enough on my blog, Twitter, and Instagram for you to know that it is one of my favourite books, so I am on tenterhooks to get my paws on Aerie and hold it in my hands. And love it, and date it. I’m definitely going to date it – where shall I take it? Is Nando’s too informal? What shall I wear?

Magonia was one of those books that stood alone solidly, but I am desperate to return to the world of Magonia and find out what happens next. Every time I hear Bird Set Free by Sia I can’t help but think about Magonia – I’ve had to remove it from my Spotify playlists because I keep thinking about Magonia and I don’t think it’s wise to be quite that distracted when driving.

 

Have you got any books on pre-order?

Book Reviews, Books, Young Adult

Did I Mention I Need You – Estelle Maskame* | YES! I got my book mojo back.

February 19, 2016

Did I Mention I Need You - Estelle Maskame

Yes! That’s what I’m talking about; I got my reading mojo back and really sunk my teeth into Did I Mention I Need You?

Towards the end of last year I read Did I Mention I Love You; the first book in the DIMLY series. You may remember that I had mixed feelings about the book because I really liked the main characters, but had some other niggles. However, I’m pleased to report that I flat out loved Did I Mention I Need You and my previous annoyances are no longer.

We pick up a year after the end of DIMILY (I know I could copy and paste, but I’m being lazy and abbreviating) and Eden is excited about the prospect of heading to New York for a few weeks because:

  • A: it’s New-freaking-York (I doubt that’s correct use of hyphens)
  • B: Tyler is living there

From the get go, you know there’s only one way this is going to go:

  1. Eden will cheat on Dean, and Eden and Tyler will get back together
  2. The whole stepsiblings thing will be an issue (a non-issue for me)
  3. Family and friends will probably find out

Aaaaand that’s exactly what happens. DIMINY was never going to be anything but predictable due to the storyline, but that doesn’t make it a bad story at all. Don’t get me wrong, a predictable book can be a bad book, but that just wasn’t the case here. Estelle Maskame sucked me into Eden and Tyler’s lives and I feel like I actually know both of them. I am unequivocally hooked on their lives.

It was nice to explore New York through Eden’s eyes, and it’s made me really want to go back. I must also add that my shoe-envy over Eden’s white Converse finally gave me something to spend a gift card on. (Thank you Estelle, you terrible enabler, you.)

Some characters from the first book make an appearance, though no where near as much as in the first book. We also meet two new characters, who I really grew to love and I think they’re stronger and more interesting supporting characters than the supporting characters were in the first book.

I don’t think it’s a spoiler for me to tell you that Eden and Tyler end up getting back together, and there are mixed reactions to their relationship when people find out. Of course, Dean is less than thrilled and despite that I couldn’t help but want Tyler and Eden to be happy.

For me, the step sibling thing hasn’t really been an issue because they weren’t raised together and don’t live together as siblings. Of course, both in real life and in the book, there are mixed reactions to that and it was interesting to see how it unfolded.

And the ending. THE ENDING! Estelle is a cruel lady. I re-read it a couple of times because I couldn’t believe what happened. I need to know when the third book is coming out because it is one of the cruellest cliffhangers I have ever encountered.

Did I Mention I Need You is exactly what I needed after the past couple of books I read didn’t really do much for me. Estelle had me hooked from the first page and I kept turning the page to find out what would happen next. It was one of those books that you groan about having to put down, and end up thinking about the characters in between reading and after you’ve read the final word.

In short: A gripping forbidden romance-fueled angst-fest set in New York.

What was the last book you read that had you absolutely hooked?

*I received a free copy of Did I Mention I Need You in exchange for an honest review – this does not affect my opinion and I would never fangirl about something I didn’t honestly enjoy.

Did I Mention I Need You - Estelle Maskame book rating - new favourite

 

Did I Mention I Need You Book Cover Did I Mention I Need You
Did I Mention I Love You
Estelle Maskame
Young adult, contemporary, romance

It's been a year since eighteen-year-old Eden Munro last saw Tyler Bruce: her stepbrother… and her secret love. Although they called time on their forbidden relationship for the sake of their family, Eden can't help but feel excited when Tyler invites her to join him in New York City for the summer.

Anyway, Eden is happy with her boyfriend Dean, and surely Tyler has moved on too. But as they spend a long, hot summer in the excitement of the city that never sleeps, it soon becomes obvious that they aren't over each other. But can they resist temptation?

Book Reviews, Young Adult

All The Rage – Courtney Summers* | The book I should have raged about

February 5, 2016

All The Rage - Courtney Summers book review

I cannot get enough of authors pushing the boat with heavy topics in young adult, and I wanted to read All The Rage as soon as I read the description.

Trigger warning: All The Rage discusses rape and sexual assault.

All The Rage follows the story of our protagonist, Romy, who is trying to deal with the aftermath of being raped. She has become an outcast from her friendship group, is regularly bullied, and it’s quickly clear that no one believes that she was raped.

The blurb focuses heavily on her attack and a link to a girl who goes missing, but the blurb is quite a poor representation of the book. I do take blurbs with a pinch of salt because their job is to pull you in, but I went into All The Rage expecting one thing and got something very different.

For starters, the attacker, who is referenced in the blurb, is only mentioned in passing in the actual book. I was expecting that maybe they were at school together and she might have to deal with that, but nope. I also thought that maybe we would see a lot more of a back and forth between people who didn’t believe her (as her attacker is labelled a ‘golden boy’), but that didn’t happen either.

I must admit that the timeline baffled me to begin with. It jumps back and forth quite confusingly (despite being labelled…) and I found it a little tricky to figure out what was happening and when. On top of that, despite the horrible things Romy was going through and having to deal with, I didn’t connect with her.

Now, I have two thoughts about why that might be:

  • I just didn’t connect with Romy
  • Romy has been through an extremely difficult time and has become very withdrawn, so maybe that’s the whole point of why I couldn’t connect?

I should have felt angry that Romy was the victim of a horrific attack and victim blaming. My blood should have been boiling because her attacker got away with it. I wanted to feel for her so badly, but it just didn’t happened. Believe me when I say I tried.

Additionally, some of her actions didn’t make sense to me and felt a little forced as a way to add something into the plot. Again, I feel like this could also be due to her mental state but I’m not entirely convinced that that’s why.

The pacing wasn’t bad, though it felt a little slow at times, but the plot didn’t do much for me as a whole; I didn’t ever feel that I could really figure out what the focus was on. A former friend going missing seemed like a bit of a distraction and I felt that the ‘resolution’ was very rushed and not particularly satisfactory for me.

In general, it felt quite directionless the majority of the time and perhaps that was the whole point, but if it was it wasn’t made clear enough. I would have preferred the book to focus on Romy coming to terms with what happened and people finally believing her.

On paper, All The Rage should have been a book I thoroughly enjoyed. I like reading about difficult topics and as Louise O’Neill proved to me in Only Ever Yours, a book about dark topics doesn’t need a happy ending, or to be nice to read in any way, to be gripping or powerful.

I’ve said mostly negative things about this book so far, but I cannot deny that it did keep me gripped. Though, some of that was me waiting to see when this book would live up to the blurb. Courtney’s writing style was beautiful also, very poetic at times.

“You know all the ways you can kill a girl?
God, there are so many.”

I also really liked the relationship between Romy, her mother and stepfather, and her boyfriend. That gave me an insight into what it must be like for parents to feel so helpless when their child is suffering. The relationship with her boyfriend made me think about something I’d never really thought about before; how do you move forward and have a relationship after going through something like that? I commend Courtney for opening my eyes there.

Now, it does seem that I’m not in the vast majority with this book because there are so many four and five star reviews for All The Rage on Goodreads. It was definitely one of those books where I read the reviews and asked myself if I was reading the same book as everyone else.

With all of the above said, I’m not going to tell you not to read it because you might read it and love it. I also think it’s really important to read about heavy topics that open our eyes to other people’s experiences and give us some kind of understanding of what it’s like to go through something like this.

I see victim blaming being challenged more and more and I think books like this can go a long way towards helping people understand what it’s like to not only have to deal with sexual assault, but to then have people think you’re a liar and / or blame you for it.

*I received a copy of All The Rage in exchange for an honest review. As nice as free books are, it does not affect my opinion of a book at all because you guys are too awesome for me to lie.

Rating for All The Rage by Courtney Summers - Meh

All The Rage Book Cover All The Rage
Courtney Summers
Young adult, contemporary
Pan Macmillan
January 28th, 2016
eBook

The sheriff’s son, Kellan Turner, is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is, and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. Because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town, the truth about him has cost her everything—friends, family, and her community. Branded a liar and bullied relentlessly by a group of kids she used to hang out with, Romy’s only refuge is the diner where she works outside of town. No one knows her name or her past there; she can finally be anonymous.But when a girl with ties to both Romy and Kellan goes missing after a party, and news of him assaulting another girl in a town close by gets out, Romy must decide whether she wants to fight or carry the burden of knowing more girls could get hurt if she doesn’t speak up. Nobody believed her the first time—and they certainly won’t now — but the cost of her silence might be more than she can bear.