Simple, vegan, apple spice cookies

Cinnamon, apple, and chocolate cookies.

It’s no secret that I love autumn, and biscuits, so it just seemed right to make autumn-inspired apple, and cinnamon cookies.

I reworked a recipe I’ve used for vegan cookies a couple of times to create delicious, soft, apple spice cookies. They’re so delicious and perfect for a cosy autumn day all snuggled up with a hot drink and a book.

A stack of cookies

Books and cookies

You can control how soft and squishy your cookies are in the middle by making them thinner or thicker. If you like cookies which are raw in the middle, make them thicker.

I’m really happy with how these cookies turned out, and the base recipe is really easy to customise to whatever flavours you fancy trying.

Apple and cinnamon cookies
Yields 16
A delicious, and simple autumn-inspired apple and cinnamon cookie.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
25 min
174 calories
26 g
17 g
8 g
2 g
5 g
44 g
10 g
17 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
44g
Yields
16
Amount Per Serving
Calories 174
Calories from Fat 68
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 8g
12%
Saturated Fat 5g
24%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 17mg
6%
Sodium 10mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 26g
9%
Dietary Fiber 1g
4%
Sugars 17g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A
4%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
4%
Iron
2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup vegan butter (I used Vitalife)
  2. 1 cup dark brown muscovado sugar
  3. 1 teaspoon of cornstarch
  4. 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder
  5. 2 tablespoons of water
  6. 1 cup + 2 tablespoons of plain flour
  7. 1/2 an apple (normal apple, doesn't need to be a cooking apple)
  8. 1 and 1/2 tablespoon cinnamon
  9. 100g chocolate (UK people's; Tesco's Finest cooking chocolate is vegan)
Instructions
  1. 1. Preheat the oven to 190C / 375F
  2. 2. Combine the butter and sugar until creamy and well combined
  3. 3. While that's mixing, cut up the apple and chocolate into small chunks
  4. 4. Mix the cornstarch, baking powder and water, before adding to the butter and sugar.
  5. 5. Add the flour, chocolate chips, and apple until it forms a dough. I've found that depending on the kind of butter you use, you might need to add more flour. If it's a bit wet, keep adding flour tablespoon at a time until it's a well-combined matte-looking dough.
  6. 6. Place on a tray, with baking paper and a sprinkle of flour. I find using an ice cream scoop / tablespoon a good measure. You might need to squish them down a bit, to make sure the middle cooks.
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calories
174
fat
8g
protein
2g
carbs
26g
more
Adapted from Baker Bettie's Easy Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies
Girl In Awe http://www.girlinawe.com/
I could eat these bad boys all day, every day of the week. In the run up to Christmas, I want to try out chocolate and orange cookies to make something that reminds me of Terry’s Chocolate Oranges.

If you give these a go, please send me a photo and let me know what you think.

What autumn-inspired cookies would you create?

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How to make strawberry basil lemonade

Here in England, we occasionally get warm days that leave you wanting to sit in the garden, talking, and drinking something refreshing. Strawberry basil lemonade is exactly the drink you’re looking for on those days.

I first discovered strawberry basil lemonade at the Hard Rock Cafe in Edinburgh. I’m not a fan of fizzy lemonade so I’d not had it in years, but there was something about the idea of strawberry and basil lemonade that piqued my interest.

Since coming back from Edinburgh at the start of the year, I’ve been saying I wanted to make it and with a little bit of warm weather, I found myself craving it. 

My recipe is bitter because that’s the way I like it, but if you want it sweeter, just add more sugar. 

I’m going to walk you through it step by step with photos, but if you scroll further down you’ll find a recipe card.

Quartered lemons

1. Cut your lemons into quarters. You can remove the pips if you want, but it doesn’t really matter as you’ll be sieving it anyway. 

Lemons, water, and sugar

2. Put the lemons and sugar into the blender, and add 1 / 4 litre of water.

Lemonade in blender

3. Blend until the lemons have been reduced to mush, add another 1 / 4 litre of water, and blend for another few seconds. You may need to place your hand, or a towel, over the lid of your blender if the water is likely to escape. 

4. Taste it at this point. Though you will be diluting it in a bit, you should be able to figure out whether it’s way to bitter for your liking. If it is, add more sugar. 

Lemonade mulch

5. Pour the mixture through a sieve and press the mulch with a spoon to get as much lemonade out as possible. 

Homemade lemonade

6. Add the remaining 1 / 2 litre of water to the lemonade, and mix. 

Strawberry and basil in a blender

7. Cut up 1 and a half cups of strawberries, and put them in the blender, along with half a cup of basil leaves, and blend. You don’t need to press the basil leaves down in the cup, just throw them in. 

8. Pour the strawberry and basil mixture to your lemonade and stir. 

Homemade strawberry and basil lemonade

9. Serve with ice, a strawberry on the side of the glass, and a few basil leaves. Enjoy in the garden on a warm afternoon with good company, or a good book. 

Strawberry basil lemonade

Strawberry basil lemonade
A delicious, refreshing strawberry basil lemonade, which is perfect for lazy summer afternoons in the garden.
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Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
605 calories
150 g
0 g
5 g
22 g
2 g
723 g
64 g
90 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
723g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 605
Calories from Fat 39
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g
7%
Saturated Fat 2g
9%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 64mg
3%
Total Carbohydrates 150g
50%
Dietary Fiber 41g
163%
Sugars 90g
Protein 22g
Vitamin A
13%
Vitamin C
549%
Calcium
173%
Iron
375%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3 unwaxed lemons
  2. 1/3 cup of sugar (this is fairly bitter, so use more if you want it to be sweet)
  3. 1 litre
  4. 2 cups of strawberries (1 1/2 cups for the lemonade, the other 1/2 for decoration)
  5. 1 cup of basil leaves (not pressed down, just thrown in the cup)
Instructions
  1. 1. Quarter three lemons. You can remove the pips if you want, but as you'll be sieving them it doesn't really matter.
  2. 2. Put chopped lemons and 1/3 sugar in the blender, and pour in 1/4 litre of water.
  3. 3. Blend for a few seconds. Once the lemons have been reduced to mush, add another 1/4 litre of water.
  4. 4. It's worth tasting it at this point. Though you're going to dilute it with the remaining 1/2 litre of water, you can get a good idea of whether it's too bitter or not. If it is, add more sugar.
  5. 5. Pour the mixture through a sieve and press the remaining mulch down with a spoon to get as much lemonade as possible.
  6. 6. Add the remaining 1/2 litre of water to the lemonade and mix.
  7. 7. Cut up 1 and a half cups of strawberries and put them in the blender, along with half a cup of basil leaves, and blend.
  8. 8. Add the strawberry and basil mixture to your lemonade and stir.
  9. 9. Serve with ice, a strawberry on the edge of the glass, and a few basil leaves. Enjoy in the garden, with a BBQ, and a good book.
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calories
605
fat
5g
protein
22g
carbs
150g
more
Girl In Awe http://www.girlinawe.com/

Have you ever tried strawberry basil lemonade?

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Pizza Wars: Germany Vs Italy


It’s fair to say I’m a bit of a pizza fanatic. Some of my friends wonder if I even eat anything else (I do.)

For years I have longed to go to Italy and eat their pizza. With the taste of that glorious pizza I had in Germany (this must be the 6000th time I’ve mentioned it now) fresh in my memory, I wanted to find out if Italy could beat it. 

With my constant waffling about the German pizza, I think we’re all aware of how high the standards are. I was confident that Italy, the birthplace of pizza, would have no problem kicking German pizza’s butt. 

I was wrong. 

During my trip to Italy I ate four pizzas at different ‘restaurants’ (that’s a term I use loosely and you’ll see why soon.) I wasn’t overly-impressed with any of them. 

First the was a pizza from a restaurant in Lake Como which was pretty bland and forgettable (Yes, I describe some pizzas as forgettable like a song.)

Secondly there was the pizza in my hotel. Now you might be saying ‘well what did you expect?’ What I expected was a delicious pizza. I’ve stayed in a few IBIS hotels this year and the one in Spain and Germany made very nice pizza. This one did not. 

In fact, it was microwave pizza. Can you believe that’s even legal in Italy? 

My IBIS pizza was an insult to Italy and pizza. The base was soggy, the tomato sauce was bitter and there was not enough cheese. It sucked. It also cost me €8.50! €8.50 for a crap pizza. The glorious German pizza only cost €7! Why not just slap me in the face?

The third was from McDonald’s. It wasn’t really a pizza, it was more like a calzonne. I think it was called a pizzarotto. It was alright but didn’t taste of much. 

The fourth was actually the best pizza I had all week, though it wasn’t great. It was a slice of pizza that had probably been sat out for hours from LIDL.

My Italian pizza experience was disappointing and Germany is the clear winner here. If you’re planning to go to Italy for pizza, don’t. Go to Im Alten Zollhaus in Aachen, Germany – it’s not that far, it’ll take you about eight hours by car. 

What’s the best pizza you’ve ever had? 




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I don’t mean to brag but my family are awesome. 

For the first time ever I spent my birthday away from my family, which meant I also spent my birthday away from cake. When I arrived home an incredible birthday cake was waiting for me. It was all Tom’s idea and my Mum played chef. 

It’s a four layered cake, with different coloured sponges, a unicorn painted on the icing and sprinkles. 

I really don’t think I can say much more about this. Look at it, IT’S A UNICORN CAKE! 

That’s it really, I just wanted to brag about my birthday cake. 

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I was going to include this in my Belgian Grand Prix post but my goodness does this deserve it’s own post. 


You would think I would find the world’s best pizza in Italy since it’s an Italian dish, but no. In Aachen, Germany, I found the best pizza in the world. I haven’t visited every country in the world but in my 22 years I’ve eaten a lot of pizza and this blew all the others out the water so I’m confident in telling you, this is the best pizza ever. 

A few doors up from our hotel was a pub called Im Alten Zollhaus. It looked quite modern on the outside but once you get in through the doors it was like walking back in time. 

I don’t know if it’s what a traditional German pub looks like because we didn’t go in any others – after four mouthfuls we decided we were going to eat in that pub all week. But it felt like it should be a traditional German pub. 

The only way I can try to explain it is if you’ve ever been in an old English pub with wooden floor, beams in the ceiling, old tins and bits and bobs on the walls and wooden tables. 

I thought about taking a picture in there but it just seemed wrong, if that makes sense. Smartphones just didn’t seem to belong in that place. It was about sitting down with good friends, eating amazing food, sampling German beer and laughing so hard it hurt. 

I dined off their phenomenal (I don’t use that word lightly) pizza all week, and my goodness they were easily the best pizzas I’ve ever eaten. The cheese on the top was like grilled cheese on toast cheese. 

You don’t just have to take my word for it, a couple of my friends had pizza too and loved it. Their schnitzel and currywurst was apparently amazing, but being a vegetarian I wouldn’t know. 

I’m genuinely concerned that any other pizza I eat will be a disappointment. In fact, the pizza was that good I would go back to Aachen just for that pizza. 

What’s the best pizza you’ve ever eaten?
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Chocolate hazelnut cheesecake

Chocolate hazelnut cheesecake



This one is not healthy at all, I’m not even going to pretend it’s healthy but we all deserve a treat occasionally and this is a delicious one. 

Last week I came across a Nutella cheesecake recipe on Vintage Teapot. Cheesecake contains my two food Achilles heels; cheese and biscuits, so I couldn’t not try it out. 

The recipe was very simple but I made two minor adjustments to it;
– I used one 350g jar of Aldi hazelnut chocolate spread instead of Nutella.
– I put all the nuts on top of the cake because I forgot to put them in the base mixture – the base still worked fine. 

My cheesecake had about 22 hours in the fridge before we ate it and it was pretty firm. It wasn’t sliding about at all or runny but it wasn’t as solid as a cheesecake you would buy from a supermarket. 

Everyone in my house agreed that it was delicious and that the recipe for the base is the best base recipe I’ve found so far. 

What’s your favourite flavour cheesecake? All of them is a correct answer.

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This recipe is seriously the best cupcake and icing recipe I have ever tried. Any words I use will not do it justice. 
It’s so fluffy and light. It’s better than any non-vegan cupcake I’ve ever tried. If you aren’t vegan I highly recommend you try it too; there are no weird ingredients in it and it has honestly produced the best cupcakes I’ve ever eaten. 
I took some into work to test it on my colleagues and they all loved it and said it was the best cupcake they’d ever eaten.
So without further ado, here’s the recipe
In the interest of complete honesty, I made the cupcakes vegan but the icing wasn’t as we only have normal butter and the icing still tastes delicious. 
I’m not going to post the recipe here but there are a couple of things I’d like to mention about it to make it easier for you. 
– the little ‘t’ means teaspoon and capital ‘T’ means tablespoon.
– the recipe says 365 which is Fahrenheit, for those of us using Celcius it’s 185C. 
– this recipe produced nine cupcakes in muffin cases 
– half a cup of melted butter = 2/3rds block of butter 
This recipe uses cups instead of weight but you can pick up a measuring cup from most supermarkets so they aren’t hard to find. Alternatively you could use a mug but you might not get the same quantity of mixture but it should still work. 
This is a fantastic recipe and it will probably replace my non-vegan recipe and I know I will definitely use the icing recipe instead of any other. 
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